http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/09/education/edlife/09data.html?_r=1&ref=admissions

CUNY macalay Honors had one deadline this year and eliminated Early Action.  I have often enquired about the social economic and racial make up that makes up Macauly Honors but never received an answered.  It looks like they do not keep track of this information.

Anyway, I also wonder why college students have complain that they never heard of Macaulay Honors.  I learned about the program in 2001 when I was a high school senior… and I attended a school that had less than a 50% graduation rate.  I was also a first generation college student.

The Macaulay Honors has their own CUNY website…  Also when you apply as a freshman, you are given the choice to click: Macaulay Honors application or the General Admissions application.  How can anyone say that they never heard of Macaulay???

I researched all my college options with the library college books, websites, and tours (I did this on my own).  I couldn’t even afford SAT books, so I borrowed them from the library.   I have to say, CUNY never visited my high school and neither did NYU.  I was very disappointed about this as I felt forgotten.  I felt like the colleges had given up on my school, my peers and myself.  Nevertheless, I decided to do my best.

I am an admission counselor and I try to do college fairs/private visits/classroom presentations at the high schools (I do outreach in Queens).  However, a lot of the high school counselors don’t even call me back or invite me (my own high school included).  Most college counselors (who are often times teachers) are in charge of hundreds of students, therefore don’t  have time to dedicate to each individual student.

I do find it disappointing that students never heard of Macaulay because maybe our office is not doing the best job to outreach students.  It’s just a click away:

http://www.cuny.edu/admissions/undergraduate/explore/honorsprograms.html

http://macaulay.cuny.edu/

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One response

  1. Professor Pok says:

    Great post…so it seems that some of your first questions may well have to be how many of your respondents were aware of the program when they applied to college and how many support the program?