When I first came across this article I thought it was a joke. The article is about a bake-sale taking place at Berkeley’s University in California where pastries would be sold by different prices according to the sex and race of each purchaser.  I was shocked by such affirmation, but as I kept reading the article, I thought that besides the equivocated idea of the bake sale, the organizers had a good intention. They claimed that the bake sale would be done to protest a Senate Bill that would allow public universities to use race, gender and ethnicity as a category for admission. However I do not agree on the way the bake sale was organized and I believe that by setting different prices to different sex and race just make things worst. How would an African American woman feels like when paying half the amount of money of a white male? In particular, I would feel humiliated and socially inferior to everybody else who would be paying more than me. I don’t need to beg discount just because I am Asian or Native American. This particular kind of attitude of setting different prices to different races, ethnicity and gender, only strengths the differences between them on a bad way.

The  bake sale organizers could have had the best of the intentions but I don’t believe that they succeed with it in any way.

A ‘Diversity Bake Sale’ Backfires on Campus

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3 responses

  1. Unamused says:

    These “affirmative action bake sales” have been going on for years. Their objective is to point out that affirmative action is fundamentally unfair. Just like blacks and Hispanics get in with lower grades than whites or Asians, now they get cupcakes for half off! Or whatever.

    It’s not about needing to beg, or about who can afford what. It’s about how wrong it is to have different standards based on race, whether you’re selling brownies or admitting college students.

    Here, for reference, is “Minding the Campus” on affirmative action: “How Diversity Punishes Asians, Poor Whites and Lots of Others.” And here are med school acceptance rates by race.

  2. I disagree that the bake sale was correct in any manner. To create a bake sale that “points out the discrimination that is inherent in Affirmative Action” is ridiculous. Humiliation is not even a factor in this bake sale.

    Instead of addressing the bigger issues that lead to the necessity of Affirmative Action to add to diversity, the “young Republicans at Berkeley” focus on the program itself. How about addressing the fact that Latinos and African Americans receive sub-par education? How could you possibly judge a white person and a Latino completely equally when their lives haven’t been?

    Consider the amount (and quality) of public libraries in largely white residential areas and then compare that to African American, Latino, Asian, and Native American neighborhoods. Or even having enough money to hire a tutor, for a prep course for the SAT and AP Tests, or for equipment for sport teams–all things a student needs for entrance into colleges.

    Affirmative Action does not hurt colleges–for when students that get in due to it, are given the chance, they excel like every other student. If we lived in a completely equal society, then there would be no need for Affirmative Action, but somehow I doubt anyone would argue that we live in an equal world.

  3. Unamused says:

    Alright, so it’s “ridiculous” to hold a bake sale to point out that affirmative action is inherently discriminatory (which it is). Why? Is the goal ridiculous, or just the method? Because the method has been pretty effective.

    The bake sale is about the fundamental unfairness of affirmative action policies. That’s why you found it so despicable in the first place: “In particular, I would feel humiliated and socially inferior to everybody else who would be paying more than me. I don’t need to beg discount just because I am Asian or Native American. This particular kind of attitude of setting different prices to different races, ethnicity and gender, only strengths the differences between them on a bad way.”

    Let me substitute the metaphor you failed to see: “In particular, I would feel humiliated and socially inferior to everybody else who would be GETTING INTO COLLEGE WITH BETTER SAT SCORES than me. I don’t need to beg discount just because I am Asian or Native American. This particular kind of attitude of setting different ADMISSION STANDARDS to different races, ethnicity and gender, only strengths the differences between them on a bad way.” Ta da.

    As for why “Latinos and African Americans receive sub-par education,” it is due to (very well established and scientifically uncontroversial) race differences in cognitive ability.

    “How could you possibly judge a white person and a Latino completely equally when their lives haven’t been?” You think, contra MLK, that we should judge people based on their race, because race is a proxy for character. You’d better have some pretty strong evidence that racism is still grinding down minorities (today, with our black president, black attorney general, etc.) — well, not Asian minorities, of course…

    “Consider the amount (and quality) of public libraries in largely white residential areas and then compare that to African American, Latino, Asian, and Native American neighborhoods.” There is no evidence that the availability of public libraries increases intelligence. Rather, less intelligent neighborhoods are less likely to have public libraries. How many libraries are there in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (average IQ ~64)? “Or even having enough money to hire a tutor, for a prep course for the SAT and AP Tests, or for equipment for sport teams…” Less intelligent parents have less intelligent kids; they are also less able to afford such things as tutors, prep courses, and sports team equipment (none of which have been shown to increase intelligence).

    It is simply false to claim that affirmative action students “excel like every other student.” Take this article: “Suit says college singled out blacks.” And this one: “College dropout rates reflect big challenges for blacks, Latinos.” And this one: “The Real Dropout Rate—And Why Some Students Should Drop Out Of School.”

    It’s true: we live in a world of inequality — innate inequality between individuals and between populations.