Everyday we encounter many people amongst many different races and ethnicities. As we learn to know the person, we usually ask about their family backgrounds, hobbies and their ethnicity. What ethnicity are you? Are you from a (certain country)? Where are you born? Where are your parents from? These are the usual questions we ask, when we meet someone new. Recently I came across this article that mentioned about how the concept of race and ethnicity has changed overtime and I thought of what we have discussed in class.

This article speaks about how America’s foreign-born population is changing and affecting the common views on race and ethnicity. Many America’s foreign-born are confused about their own race and ethnicity identity. According to the article, more than 1/50 Americans identified themselves as “multiracial” because they don’t know how to classify themselves and which race they fit into. As we have discussed in class, we have mentioned that many Hispanic born Americans refer themselves to be multiracial due to their confusion of their Hispanic background or when Hispanic is not given as an option when filling out important forms and documents. We have also discussed about how many Russians and Polish identified themselves as whites based on their lighter skin color and given that white is the closest choice to their race. What race and ethnicity are you? This is the biggest question New York City faces due to the diversity of our state.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/22/us/22census.html

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